Elliot Coat of Arms

Roger ELLIOTT

Male Abt 1665 - 1714  (~ 49 years)


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  • Name Roger ELLIOTT 
    Born Abt 1665  Tangier Garrison, Tangier, Morocco, Africa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 15 May 1714  Byfeld House, Barnes, SRY, ENG Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 21 May 1714  St Mary the Virgin, Barnes, SRY, ENG Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I10230  Elliot Clan
    Last Modified 7 Dec 2013 

    Father George ELLIOTT,   b. Abt 1636, , , , ENG Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1668, Tangier, Morocco Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 32 years) 
    Mother Catherine MAXWELL,   b. Abt 1638, , , , ENG SCT or IRL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Dec 1709, Tallow, , County Waterford, IRL Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 71 years) 
    Married Abt 1660  St Mary Somerset Church, LND, ENG Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F3873  Group Sheet

    Family Charlotte ELLIOT,   b. Abt 1692, of Wells, , ROX, SCT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef May 1753  (Age ~ 61 years) 
    Married 4 Mar 1712  St Peter's Church, Cornhill, LND, ENG Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Granville (Cotoco) ELLIOTT,   b. 7 Oct 1713, Byfeld House, Barnes, SRY, ENG Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Oct 1759, , Rodheim an der Bieber, , DEU Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 46 years)
     2. Catherine (Kitty) ELLIOTT,   b. 18 Sep 1714, Byfeld House, Barnes, SRY, ENG Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jan 1758  (Age 43 years)
    Last Modified 17 Nov 2014 
    Family ID F3871  Group Sheet

  • Notes 
    • Roger Elliott (cir 1665-1714)
      =======================
      See Wikipedia article

      Half-brother of Alexander Spotswood, Governor of Virginia.

      1680/10/27 Ensign, Tangier Regiment of Foot. Was wounded at Tangier in engagement with the Moors
      1681/08/22 Suspended by Colonel Percy Kirke, Governor of Tangier, for fighting a duel with Ensign Bartholomew Pitts
      1681/11/07 Cashiered, by order of his Majesty, for duelling
      1682/06/14 Served in ranks of the same Regiment. Sent home to England with a letter from Colonel Percy Kirke begging 'readmission' into His Majesty's Service
      1683/12/23 Letter containing reinstatement by His Majesty's Order
      1683/03/08 Reinstatement as Ensign in his old Company
      1683/10/01 Reinstated as Ensign in Tangier Regiment of foot (2nd Queen's) - equivalent to 2nd Lieutenant of Infantry
      1684/04/?? Returned to England. Probably fought against the Monmouth Rebellion
      1685/02/11 Queen Dowager's Regiment of Foot
      1687/11/?? First Lieutenant of Grenadiers in Earl of Bath's Regiment of Foot (i.e. Sir John Granville 1628-1701)
      1690/05/01 Captain of Grenadier Company, Earl of Bath's Regiment of Foot
      1692/08/03 Wounded at Battle of Steinkirk
      1692/12/21 Appointed Major, Earl of Bath's Regiment of Foot
      1696/01/01 Lieutenant-Colonel of Sir Bevil Granville's Regiment of Foot
      There were few Sir Bevil Granvilles around at this time. One of them was born 29 August 1628 in Virginia, and became Governor of Barbados. (Roger had links with Barbados through the Graeme family). Alexander Spotswood, his half-brother, was a Lieutenant
      1703/??/?? Present at defence of Tongeren, where he was shot through the body. Took on entire French Army with only two regiments. Surrendered. NB: The Duke of Marlborough liberated Venlo, Roermond, Stevensweert and Liege in 1702 and returning from visiting the UK, he liberated Bonn, Huy and Limburg in 1703. Presumably, Tongered fits in with these - perhaps an adjunct of the liberation of Huy, which is near Tongeren? In 1704, Marlborough then moved to Schellenberg and then Blenheim in southern Germany.
      1704/03/05 Raised own regiment - Colonel Roger Elliot's Regiment of Foot
      1704/Easter
      Certificate that Richard Davis of Claines, labourer, is a fit person
      to be a soldier and is handed over to Capt Joseph Dussaux, of the
      Regt of Foot commanded by Col Roger Elliott - 20s paid to him & 10s
      to Constable by Capt D (=Dussaux?).
      Worcester Record Office Ref 1/1/195/61
      1704/04/10 Officers commissioned at St James'
      1704/07/02 Wounded at Battle of Schellenberg
      1704/08/13 Possibly fought at the Battle of Blenheim??
      The Dictionary of National Biography states that Roger commanded the cavalry under Marlborough. He did *NOT* lead the Cavalry - this was General Lord John 'Salamander' Cutts. It is not clear that Major General Roger Elliott even fought at the Battle of Blenheim, although this is possible.
      1705/03/?? Roger Elliott's regiment embarked for Spain in the spring and served at Gibraltar, which had only just been taken from Spain (in 1704). Arrived with Peterborough, but used with another Corps (Bowles') to relieve the seasoned garrison of Gibraltar
      1705/10/01 The Will of Lieutenant Hezekiah Wharton of Roger's Regiment in Gibraltar survives in the PRO
      1706/??/?? Gibraltar declared a free port
      1707/01/01 Appointed Brigadier-General
      1707/??/?? Appointed Colonel & Lieutenant-Governor of Gibraltar.

      1707/02/05 PRO PC 1/2/51 Admiralty memorial concerning the rival claims to a prize ship of the Lieutenant Governor of Gibraltar

      (Colonel Roger Elliott) and the crew of HMS Carcass.

      His Royal Highness Prince George
      of Denmarke &c Lord High
      Admiral of England Ireland &c
      and of all her Majesty's Planta
      tions &c and Generaliss ...
      of all Her Majesty's &c

      Memorial for Her Majesty in Councill

      A Petition having been presented unto
      Me by Col Roger Elliot, Lieutenant Governr
      for her Majesty of the Fort of Gibraltar ...
      setting forth, That the Ship Nostra Seigniora
      del Rosario whereof Francis Pujal was Master
      in the month of June last as she lay at ...
      Anchor in the Bay of Gibraltar, within ...
      Gun Shott of the Fort, was with her Lading
      Seized by Your Petitioner's Orders for ...
      My use as belonging to her May's Enemy
      and as a Perquisite of the Admiralty of
      England, that after severall proceedings
      had, against the said Ship and Lading, ...
      in her Mays High Court of Admiralty of
      England, the Judges of the Said Court ...
      the 19th of September last, Condemned the ...

      ---

      same, as a good and Lawfull Prize, and as a ...
      Perquisite of the Admiralty; This Petitioner
      therefore prayes that in Consideration of his
      services in the said Seizure, and Expences in
      preserving the Ship and Cargo, and as an
      encouragement, the grant of the Said Ship
      and Lading, or such part thereof as I shall
      think fitt.

      And another Petition having also ...
      been presented unto Me, by Capt Covill
      Mayne Commander of Her May Bomb ...
      Vessele the Carcass, on behalf of himself ...
      and the rest of the Officers and Mariners ...
      belonging to the said Vessele: Settingforth,
      That the Petitioner being with her Mays
      said Ship in the Bay of Gibraltar, ...
      about the 3rd of June last, there came in
      Spanish , called the Nostra Seigniora
      del Rosario, the Petitioners sent an Officer ...
      aboard her to visit her, and if found her
      to belong to any place then under subjection
      to the Duke of Anjou, to Seize her, and
      the Said Officer finding her to belong to ...
      Majorca, did seize her as Prize, that the ...
      said being Seiz'd in Port and not

      ---

      upon the Main Sea, hath been Condemned in
      High Court of Admiralty, as a Perquisite of the
      Lord High Admiralty, And therefore prays the
      same proportion of the said Prize, as if she
      had been taken on the high Sea. I have
      Considered of both the abovementioned Petition
      and have taken the Opinion of Doctor Bra
      late Surrogate to the Judge of the High Court
      Admiralty, who having examined thereunto
      Reports to Me as followeth Vizt.

      I find that the Master and Company
      " the Nostra Seignora del Rosario Francis
      " Pujolls Master, came of their own accord
      " into the harbour, as appears by his and
      " of his Ships Company's Declarations by
      " the Said Ship and Lading have been
      " Condemned as Prize and that after having
      " fastened his Ship he went onshoar we
      " his papers and Pass, in order to deliver
      " up his Ship and Lading as Prize to
      " aforesaid Lieutenant Governor, and
      " Conducted by the Captain of the Port
      " his Lodgings, did there surrender him
      " up with papers and Pass thereto belong
      " to the Said Governor, did direct the Captain
      " the said Port and the Agent for Prize

      ---

      " to go and take possession of her, and to secure
      " the hatches of the said Vessele.
      " But, by severall Affidavits layd before ...
      " Me, and by me perused on behalf of Capt
      " Covile Mayn and Company, Petitioners ...
      " likewise, it does appear that the said Capt
      " Mayne upon the arrival of the said Ship
      " in the said harbour and her being at
      " Anchor, and before he went onshore,...
      " did give orders to his Officers to go and
      " visit the said Ship, and if an Enemy to ...
      " seize the same.
      " And it does appear that the Governor of
      " the said Carcass, Bomb, had entered her
      " and Struck the Colours thereof, before that
      " those from the Governors came up to the said Prize.
      " It is likewise sworne, that severall persons
      " seizing the said Shipp and Lading, were at great
      " Labour and pains in bringing in and securing ...
      " her, which they soon after delivered up to the ...
      " Officers for the Lord High Admiral's use.
      " Now upon consideration of the severall
      " Facts, and the services that have been done by
      " all Parties, I am humbly of Opinion ...

      ---

      " that a Moiety of the said Ship and Lading ...
      " according to the Lord High Admiral's wanted
      " encouragement to all that have perform'd ...
      " such good services, may be allow'd the ...
      " Capt. But how how to adjust the proportion ...
      " to be bestowed on the Lieutenant Governr ...
      " for his Service, and what may be ...
      " reasonable for the Captain and his Company
      " with respect to their merritts to have, ...
      " seems to me most proper for the Great
      " goodness and Bounty of the Lord High
      " Admirale to determine.
      " But I take leave to add that in the severale
      " affidavits before mentioned, it is sworne, that ...
      " the Ship was in such a Station at the time
      " of Seizure by Captain Main's men, as ...
      " she might have gone away before any one
      " came for her from the aforesaid Lieut
      " Governor.


      I therefore offer My humble Opinion
      to her Majesty that one Moiety of ...
      the produce of the said Ship Mostra Seignora
      del Rosaria may be allowed to the Captain and

      ---

      Company of the said Bomb Vessell the Carcass and
      the Lieutenant Governor, And that the said ...
      Lieut. Governor have one Eight part ...
      thereof, which is the Share of a Flag Officer, ...
      which is nevertheless humbly submitted to ...
      her Majesty




      Admrtly Office
      1 Jany 1706/7


      By command of his Royl Highness



      1707/12/24 Appointed Governor of Gibraltar taking over from Prince George of Hesse-Darmstadt who had governed from 4 Aug 1704 to 24 Dec 1707, and Admiral Sir George Rooke who had been military commander from the occupation on 24 Jul 1704 until 4 Aug 1704. Took up residence in the Convent of the Franciscan Friars (??). (Nowadays, the Chief Minister of Gibraltar officially resides at No 6 Convent Place.)
      1708/??/?? Roger Elliott's Regiment of Foot is based in Spain
      1708/??/?? Left his regiment
      1710/05/22 Letter to Lord Galway

      "I am heartily sorry to inform yr Excy that on the 20th about 11 of the clock I had information that a mutiny was design'd to be about 1 of the clock of the same day. I went immediately to the Parrade, and the Mutineers, fearing some discovery came out in a body of about 200 men, who with their arms went down to the Queen's Battery, and forc't the land Portguard, and turn'd the Cannon upon the Town.
      I immediately beat an alarm, and stop't the remaining part of the two English Regiments and then form'd them and the Dutch, and call'd a Councill of War, which resolved that fair means were to be us'd by reason that according to all circumstances the whole Garrison was in the Mutiny, and if force should be us'd the Town would run a hazard of being lost.
      Twas agreed by a Council of War to send an officer to them to know their demands, and what they demanded was soft bread and wine, and 11s. which had been stop't for bread, and also pardon for all past. It was at last agreed by the Council of War that I should grant their demands, and that they were paid upon the spott, and then they laid down their arms. All imaginable care and dilligence hath and shall be us'd for the safety and preservation of the garrison, it being the greatest misfortune to me and the officers that considering the Circumstances we had not men that we could trust to, to oblidge them to do their duty"

      1710/01/01 Appointed Major General
      1710/12/03 Reports that Major-General Roger Elliott sent out 3 companies of Englishman, & 40 Spaniards under Lt-Col James Granville, of Elliott's Regiment. Marched out 3 Dec.
      1711/01/24 (possibly 13 Jan) Handed over Governorship of Gibraltar to Brigadier-General Thomas Stanwix who would govern from 24 Jan 1711 to 7 Aug 1713
      1711/06/18 Departed Gibraltar
      17??/??/?? Resided at Byfeld House, Church Road, Barnes, Surrey - and central London
      1712/03/01

      "Vicar Generals' Office
      1st March 1711/12
      Which day appeared personally William
      Elliot of the Pish: of Saint Martins' in the
      Fields, in the County of Middx: Gent: and
      deposed that there is a marriage intended
      to be solemnized between Roger Elliot of
      the Pish: of Saint Martin's in the Fields
      aforesaid, Esqre aged above 35 yeares and a
      Batchelor and Charlot Elliot of the same
      Pish: aged about 20 yeares, a Spinster
      this Deponts Daughter, he is not knowing or
      beleiving any Impediment by reason of any
      precontract Consanguinity Affinity or any other
      lawful means whatsoever to hinder the said
      intended marriage of the truth of which he
      made Oath and prayed Licence for them to be
      married in the Parish Church of St Michael or
      St Peter's, Cornhill, London
      Wm Elliot
      "



      1712/03/?? Marriage Banns read out in St Mary the Virgin, Barnes, Surrey
      1712/03/?? Marriage details gives:
      "Roger Elliot of St Martin's in the Fields London &
      Charlott Elliot of the same parish. Licence."
      Presumably, he had a central London residence (possibly
      York Buildings, where Charlotte's father William was staying in 1714 / 1715)
      and Barnes then counted as a country house?
      1712/06/24 Bought copyhold of Byfield House, Church Road, Barnes, Surrey
      1714/03/07 Will PCC - PRO PROB 11, 543, quire 218, ff. 68 lefthand-69 lefthand
      "This is the last Will and Testament of Mr Roger Elliott of Barnes
      in the County of Surrey Esq Made this xx
      seventh day of March in the twelvth year of the reigne of our
      Sovereigne Lady Anne by the grace of God of Great Britain &
      France and Ireland Queen Defender of the Ffaith Died 1713
      Ffirst I resigne my Soule to Almighty God xxxxx
      Stedfastly believing throw the meritts of my Saviour Jesus Christ
      to obtain pardon of all My Sins And I desire to be buried xxx
      privately as my Executrix hereinafter named shall think fitt
      And whereas I have with Charlott the xx
      daughter of Mr William Elliot and have already made provision
      and settlemt for her in Case she shall happen to survive me
      of two hundred pounds per Annum in Annuities, now I do hereby
      further give unto my said Wife All my Goods plate & furniture
      of and in my house or Tenemt: I now live in at Barnes in the
      said County of Surry with all her Rings Watches Jewells and other
      things whatsoever there Item I give to My Son Granville Elliott and
      to his heires for ever All that my aforesaid Messuage or
      Tenemt garden and Lands lying in Barnes aforesaid with the Appurtances
      of the said Messuage and premises being Copyhold
      I have duly surrendered to the use of my Will Item I give to
      My Son or Daughter that my Said Dear Wife is now with x
      Child of be it boy or girls when tis Borne the sum of Ffifteen
      hundred pounds of Lawfull Mony to be put out of
      interest by my Executor hereafter for the benefit and education
      of Such Boy or Girls until he or She Shall
      attaind to his or her age of One and Twenty years And my Earnest
      desire is that my Son or Sons may be x
      brought up to Some employment And in Case both my Children should
      dye before they come ot the age of One and
      Twenty years or dayes of marriages I Give and devise to my said
      Deare Wife the Sums of One Thousand pounds of
      Lawfull Mony to be paid to my said Wife in this Three Months next
      after my Decease over and above what is already
      by this my Will given her. Item I give and Bequeath to my Brother
      Alexander Spottswood in Case my said
      Children shall All dye before they come to their ages of One
      and Twenty years or married All the profitts of my death
      and personal Estate for and duringe the Terme of his naturall life
      and not longer And from and after my said Brother
      Spottswood decease I give and divise All my reall and personall Estate
      wheresoever and whatsoever to My
      very Loving Ffather in Law Mr William Elliott in York Buildings
      and to his heires Executors and Administrators
      forever Item I give to my Cousin John Grahame twenty pounds
      to buy him Mourning Item I give to my sister
      Margaret Andrewes The Sume of Three hundreds pounds and to my
      brother Alexander Spottswood the Sume of Ffive
      hundred pounds All the rest and residue both of my reall and personall
      Estate wheresoever and whatsoever I give and
      devise to my Son Granville Elliott to him and his heires for ever
      And of this my last Will and testament (revoking
      and annulling all other Wills by me heretofore made) I constitute
      and appointe my said Ffather in Law Mr William
      Elliott Sole Executor of this my last Will and Testamt: desiring
      him to performe this my will and pay all my debts and legacy's
      and for his Care and trouble therein I give him the sum of two
      hundred pounds In witness whereof
      I have hereunto set My hand and the day and year first
      above written and then
      published and declared the same to be my last Willand Testamt
      Sealed published and declared R. Elliott
      in the presence of us

      Edward D'auverque
      Rich'd Bowles
      N Trayton

      At London March the Seventh one Thousand Seven hundred and Thirteen years, I having made my Will this day and calling to remembrance that there is a sume of Money due by me to my Brother Gov. Alexr Spotswood Govr of Virginia near to, but not exceeding Two hundred pounds, I do hereby acknowledge the debt, seeing there is noe other Note, Bond, or Voucher for it, and Wills and Allows the Same should be paid him over and above what Legacyes he may be intitled to by my aforesaid Will. In Wittnesse whereof I have Signed, those prt day and place above written. (R. Elliott.)


      1714/05/15 Died at (Barn Elms Manor House?), Barnes
      1714/05/18-20 The Post-Boy: "On Saturday night last dyed Major-General Eliot, late Governor of Gibraltar" - NB: Roger Elliott didn't spell his surname as Eliot ever in his lifetime
      1714/05/21 Buried at St Mary the Virgin, Barnes or the Old Cemetery, Barnes?
      1714/??/?? Church Warden Accounts for St Mary the Virgin, Barnes (SHS P6/2/1) p.93 gives:
      "An Account of Moneys Rec'd by Mr Hammatt 1714
      By Cash Received for Generall Elliott's Burial 00-06-8
      "
      1714/11/16 Probate of Will - PROB 10/1515 CC 2646

      Decimo Sexto Die mensio Novembris anno domini millesimo septuigentesimo decimo quarto // Emanavit Commissio Charlotte Elliott Vidua Matri naturali et legitima et Curatrici legitime assignata Granville Elliott Infanti filio naturali et legitimo et legatario residuario nominat in Testamenta Rogeri Elliott inperde Barne in comitatu Surria Armignori defuncti habentis et ad administrandum bone jura et credita dicti defunti juxta tenorem et offertum Testamenti ipsius defuncti in usum et beneficium dicti Minoris et donet ipse vinesimum primum aetatis sue annum attigorit (eoquod Gulielmus Elliott Executor et Oneri Executionis dicti Testamenti expresso renunctiavit) De bono et fidelitor administrando eadem ad Sancta Dei Evangelia jurat./. Exam.

      1712-1715 PRO C104/251 Chancery: Master Tinney's Exhibits
      ELLIOTT v BURROUGHS: Bills, receipts, vouchers and accounts paid by William 'Laceman' Elliott (actually Elliot) on behalf of his daughter, Charlotte Elliott, administratix of his son-in-law Major General Roger Elliott, deceased (most items marked 1-70) It appears that Charlotte Burroughs (as Charlotte remarried) or her new husband may have sued the Estate of her previous husband over payment of the debts that may have ensued. Presumably this was a device to ensure that her new husband was not saddled with debts from Charlotte's first marriage.

      From Jessica & Edith Eliot's family history:

      "Of Genl Roger Eliot we cannot speak too highly for no pen could write of his love and affection to his family & to others - as also as his half brother Alexander Spottiswoode. During her later years Roger kept his mother 'in a handsome way', with a carriage bearing a Coat of Arms. He wrote to tell her 'not to stint herself'. Mrs Mercer was somewhat distressed, as owing to business arrangements of her son Alex. Spottiswoode, she had to sign for the money & she said, although her son Eliot was so good to her, her son Spottiswoode would suffer for it; but no eyes will ever read again the letter of Genl Roger Eliot, because his mother carried it about with her, until it mouldered away."

      From The Times of 19 May 1914:
      (FROM A CORRESPONDENT)

      The Post Boy, May 18 to May 20, 1714:- On Saturday night last dyed Major-General Eliot, late Governor to Gibraltar.

      This week, therefore, has seen the 200th anniversary of the death of the first Englishman officially appointed to be Governor of Gibraltar, December 24, 1707, being the actual date of his appointment as such, although he was in command of the fortress as early as 1705. Eliot in 1703 raised "Colonel Roger Eliot's Newly Raised Regiment of Foot," which sailed for Spain in May, 1705, and after a short stay at Lisbon arrived at Gibraltar in the following July The garrison at this date was in a state of great disorder, owing to " feuds" and "animosities" and it was found that the time had come to settle a regular Government. Shortly after his arrival General Eliot took over the command, and never left the fortress until the early part of 1711. During this period (1706) it was declared a free port. In order to keep up the food supplies of the garrison, the Governor was forced to give passes to small vessels, which passes were not recognized by the pirates who infested the northern coasts of Africa-hence if such vessels were captured, the master complained to the Consul at Algiers, who in his turn complained to General Eliot. Eliot was, however, forced again and again to provision his garrison by means of this method, and the wisdom of his policy was shown by the fact that a few months after he gave up the command Gibraltar was nearly starved out and lost.
      MUTINY OF THE GARRISON.
      Some of the recruits sent out to Gibraltar were drawn direct from prisons: and it is not surprising that a mutiny took place in the garrison. In his letter of May 22, 1710, to Lord Galway, General Eliot gives the following account of the affair:
      I am heartily sorry to inform yr. Excelly. that on the 20th about 11 of the clock I had information that a mutiny was design'd to be about 1 of the clock of the same day. I went immediately to the Parrade, and the Mutineers, fearing some discovery, came out in a body of about 200 men, who with their Arms went down to the Queen's Battery, and forc't the land Portguard, and turn'd the Cannon upon the Town. I immediately beat an alarm, and stop't the remaining part, of the two English Regiments, and then., form'd them and the Dutch, and call'd aCouncill of War, which resolved that fair means were to be us'd by reason that according to all circumstances the whole Garrison was in the Mutiny, and if force should be tu'd the Town would run a hazard of being lost. All agreed by a Council of War to send an officer to them to know their demands, and what they demanded was soft bread and wine, and 1s. which had been stop't for bread, and also pardon for all past. It was at last agreed by the Council of War that I should grant their demands, and they were paid upon the spot, and then they laid down their arms. All imaginable care and dilligence hath and shall be us'd for the safety and preservation of the garrison, it being the greatest misfortune to me and the officers that considering the Circumstances we had not men that we could trust to, to oblige them to do their duty. All disputes being arranged, the garnison settled down quietly, and General Eliot remained at his post until the spring of 171 1, when he was succeeded in the command by Brigadier-General Stanwix. General Eliot was buried in Barnes Churchyard; no monument marks the spot where he lies; history has almost forgotten him; but the reward of that gallant little band who so sternly held the Rock is enough-Gibraltar is ours to-day.
      ELIOT OF GIBRALTAR. 200TH ANIVERSARY OF HIS DEATH. FIRST GOVERNOR OF THE ROCK.


  • Sources 
    1. [S86] #2066, 156.




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